Mink Machine

Review: Anatomy of Restlessness

Anatomy of Restlessness

Bruce Chatwin had a very unique touch to his storytelling. It often goes from simple dialog to pondering philosophy in less than a few sentences. As a result of this, his books can be both excellent and dry at the same time, even on the same page. But I still consider him to be my all-time favorite travel writer.

Chatwin often claimed that humans were essentially nomads, driven by curiosity and restlessness to discover new places. The normal state was supposed to be movement and Chatwin himself tried to embody the words of Rimbaud, “ĽHomme aux semelles de vent” (man with soles of wind). During his later years he got rid of many possessions he had earlier collected in a frenzy around the world and hunted for stories instead of objects.

This book is a collection of previously unreleased stories and essays, brought together after his early death in 1989. I’ve read most of Chatwin’s books and it’s difficult to recommend just one of them, since each have its special flavor. “In Patagonia” is widely regarded as his most popular book and parts of it is great writing, but in my opinion this book is Chatwin at his very best – witty, intelligent and enthusiastic. If you want to know more about Chatwin I can also recommend the biography by Nicholas Shakespeare.

Related posts

Comments

No comments yet.

Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Featured stories

Road trip across the American Southwest

"We drove along Route 6, Route 66 and Route 666. If there was a Route 6666, we must have missed that turn."

Roaming through Banff

"Even though the main town is surrounded by mountains with names such as Sulphur Mountain, it is as far away from Mordor as one could imagine."

Reliving history in Washington D.C.

"As I entered the heavily guarded Rotunda in the center, some of the most famous documents in the world laid before me."

On the Trans-Siberian

"Since the toilets were locked during the seven hour stop, we had to bribe the provodnitsas to use the facilities. Then came the Mongols."

Greetings from Moldova

"But Chisinau is an unexpected gem in the wilderness. Even though Moldova is one of the poorest countries in Europe, the capital has its fair share of impressive buildings and post-Soviet architecture."

The dark days of Sarajevo

"The city survived on the edge of annihilation and has started to recover, but the stone walls still seem to cry out in lament of all the horrible things they have seen."

Instagram