Mink Machine

Review: All Inclusive

All Inclusive

I have been subscribing to Swedish travel magazine Vagabond for more than a decade and Johan Tell used to be one of my favorite regular writers. He often wrote in a funny way, describing hilarious issues on the road.

This book is a collection of his small stories previously published in Vagabond. There are tales of singing Swedish child songs in a bazaar in Tehran, having telephone conversation with Ola Skinnarmo at the North Pole, visiting gay bars in Bangkok, finding Jimi Hendrix house in Essaouira and much much more.

I met him once but was surprised at how different he was in real life. In fact, I wouldn’t have guessed he was the same person as the author in a million years. But the writing is however quite entertaining. Even if you have read most of the stories already in the paper magazine, I still recommend picking up a copy of the book for a concentrated dose of entertaining travel episodes.

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