Mink Machine

9-11: Blogosphere five years later

Five years ago, the world changed forever and the web changed with it. Remember what Google looked like on that day? It is a reminder of the crippled state of the web on that fatal day, when the large news sites were down due to unprecedented traffic. The sites adopted after a while and offered a slimmer interface with less images to download, but people had already started searching for answers in other places.

Many of the survivors and relatives turned to online journals to share their answers, experiences and grief with people all across the world. These were the early blogs before that name was even invented.

Three years later, I watched the television broadcasts from a room in San Francisco when hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. Large companies had laughed at blogs for years, saying they were unreliable and of no importance as news sources. The previously taunted suddenly faced redemption as blog entries and Flickr photos were referred to and displayed world-wide during live broadcasts on CNN, actually adding more value than any distance shots could possibly offer.

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