Mink Machine

Morocco - Beyond the mint tea

Marrakech, Essaouira, Agadir, Immouzzer, Atlas mountains and other strange place.

  • Lullaby for the Atlantic ocean

    This town is horrible in a lot of ways, but the beach is nice.

    [The beach in Agadir]

  • Arabian baywatch

    Keeping a close eye on the tides.

    [Frida at the beach in Agadir]

  • The shape of things to come

    A terrible earthquake hit Agadir in 1960, killing a third of the city's population. The city was rebuilt a few kilometers to the south of the old town, leaving it an area where construction is forbidden until 2010.

    [Sunset from the Kasbah in Agadir]

  • Desert rose

    There is a large text on the Kasbah mountain. We had several looney ideas until someone told us that it said 'God, king, country'.

    [Frida at the beach in Agadir]

  • Yalla yalla

    We repacked our backpacks and went north to Marrakech. The traffic was insane and I enjoyed it a lot.

    [Avenue Mohammed V, Marrakech]

  • Needle of faith

    If the constant noise from the lively square wasn't enough for you, the place is surrounded by three minarets shouting call to prayer.

    [Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Godzilla sighted

    In the eye of the storm. The traffic in this town was really insane.

    [Reine in Marrakech]

  • All along the watchtower

    Koutoubia is the largest mosque in Marrakech, completed in the 12th century. The model has inspired lots of other mosques and buildings.

    [Koutoubia, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Originally a place where they placed chopped-off heads to scare the crowds, this is the main square of Marrakech occupied by snake charmers, food stalls and all sorts of strange people from dusk till dawn. A heavy smoke rises from the wild cooking and there is a constant noise of activity.

    [Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Nothing living escapes the clay pots. Have you got the stomage for trying the mystery dishes?

    [Food stands at Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Originally a place where they placed chopped-off heads to scare the crowds, this is the main square of Marrakech occupied by snake charmers, food stalls and all sorts of strange people from dusk till dawn. A heavy smoke rises from the wild cooking and there is a constant noise of activity.

    [Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    You would call me Gyllenhaal-wannabe if you knew even half of the story.

    [Reine looking out over Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Originally a place where they placed chopped-off heads to scare the crowds, this is the main square of Marrakech occupied by snake charmers, food stalls and all sorts of strange people from dusk till dawn. A heavy smoke rises from the wild cooking and there is a constant noise of activity.

    [Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Nothing living escapes the clay pots. Have you got the stomage for trying the mystery dishes?

    [Food stands at Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • Dining under the stars

    Nothing living escapes the clay pots. Have you got the stomage for trying the mystery dishes?

    [Food stands at Djemaa el Fna, Marrakech]

  • A thousand Arabian nights

    We found a lovely riad in the medina. The interior garden with fountain provided a retreat from the busy streets outside and was an extraordinary experience!

    [Staying at Riad Lakhdar]

  • A thousand Arabian nights

    We decided to check out another riad which sounded cool, but after getting lost for hours beyond Bab Doukala we almost gave up. Fortunately a bunch of children happily showed us the way into the labyrinth until we arrived at this anonymous door...

    [Riad Nejma Lounge, Marrakech]

  • A thousand Arabian nights

    ...which hid a very luxury riad indeed! I liked the Black Lodge-wibes.

    [Riad Nejma Lounge, Marrakech]

  • A sip of Arabian coffee

    A decade had passed since my last coffee in a north African country, so I figured it was about time. I tried my ordinary order of mezzo. The closest resemblance around here is called 'noss noss'. It probably translates into 'half and half' which is another name for the brew. And the additional pancakes were excellent.

    [Having breakfast in Marrakech]

  • Not upstairs at Eric's

    Life is good.

    [Reine in Marrakech]

  • Crossroads

    We're not in Kansas anymore.

    [Marrakech]

  • Coast guard

    The standin for Hasselhoff.

    [Along the Atlantic coast road]

  • Shadows moving in the light

    The medina of Essaouira resembles an 18th century fortified European town. Several people have been inspired by the magic light of Essaouira including Orson Welles and Jimi Hendrix.

    [Ave Zerktouni, Essaouira]

  • Castles made of sand

    The medina of Essaouira resembles an 18th century fortified European town. Several people have been inspired by the magic light of Essaouira including Orson Welles and Jimi Hendrix.

    [Skala du Port, Essaouira]

  • For the birds

    [Skala du Port, Essaouira]

  • Spice up your life

    [Essaouira]

  • Travel light

    Just one more. I double-dare you.

    [Small town]

  • Travel light

    Just one more. I double-dare you.

    [Small town]

  • Servant of the secret fire

    We found Gandalf the Green!

    [Small town]

  • It's a long road

    Theresia joined up and we went for a small trekk in the Atlas mountains.

    [Frida and Theresia in Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • Sandy road

    [Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • Tranquility

    [Berber village in Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • The man and his argan tree

    Life in the shade.

    [Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • Sandy road

    [Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • Mortgage manor

    [Immouzzer, Atlas mountains]

  • Snow in Sahara

    [Atlas mountains]

  • I see you

    [Reine the Hut somewhere in Agadir]

  • Snow in Sahara

    [The Atlas mountains]

Reine

About

Reine is a web developer who enjoys caffeine-fueled urban traveling. More...

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