Mink Machine

New York - Autumn in the Big Apple

All around Manhattan.

  • The taste of neon

    There's a lot of neon lights in the area surrounding Times Square, not to mention the smell of pretzels.

    [42nd Street]

  • If walls had eyes

    John Lennon lived in this building and was shot at the entrance here on 72nd street in 1980. The Strawberry Fields memorial is directly across the road.

    [Dakota Building on Central Park West]

  • Pretzel hunter

    Dressed in black but surrounded by color.

    [Reine at Times Square]

  • The road

    Fifth Avenue goes all the way from the rugged Harlem in the north down to the wealthy areas in the south. One road with large differences.

    [Fifth Avenue, as seen from the Empire State Building]

  • Midtown madness

    If you have seen one, you have seen them all. Chrysler, UN and the other old friends.

    [View from Empire State Building]

  • Atlas shrugged

    Some people out there are carrying a lot on their shoulders. The large Atlas statue on Rockefeller Center is shadowed by St Patrick's Cathedral on Fifth Avenue.

    [Atlas statue and St Patrick's Cathedral]

  • Urban mutants

    Look who I found at 22nd Street! It would seem that Xavier forgot his contact lenses at the institute.

    [The X-men celebrating Halloween in New York]

  • Beneath the stars

    Train stations are some of my favorite places, and I tend to seek them out when I visit a new city. This one is perhaps the greatest of them all, having 44 platforms and 67 train tracks. The four-faced clock on top of the information booth is a well-known icon, and the ceiling is covered by star constellations. These were originally painted in 1912 but later obscured by decades of smoking, until rediscovered at a restoration in 1999.

    [Grand Central Terminal]

  • Lair of King Kong

    The building is flooded in light, color depending on the season.

    [Empire State Building]

  • Leaving the Hudson

    [Mandus scouting at 12th avenue]

  • Lady of the lake

    This copper statue of the Liberty goddess was a gift from France in 1885. A land battery was constructed in the shape of an 11-point star in 1806 and the remains form the foundation for the statue. There are actually several copies of the famous statue, the most well-known being the one in Paris situated on a bridge across Seine, not far from the Eiffel tower. It can also be seen on the old car license plates of New York.

    [Liberty Island]

  • I recall the park at fall

    The Central Park at it's very best in autumn. The same year as this picture was taken scientists discovered a new species of centipede in the park, living in the dead leaves beneath the trees.

    [View from Belvedere castle, Central Park]

  • Friends of old

    There's something missing. Two, in fact.

    [Lower Manhattan]

  • Strangers in the night

    Ordinary streetlife in the Greenwich village.

    [Creatures of the night]

  • The forest angel

    The name of this famous fountain comes from the story of an angel giving healing powers to the pool of Bethesda in ancient Jerusalem. The statue on top, Angel of the waters, is a neoclassical winged female figure symbolizing the opening of the Croton Aqueduct in 1842 that brought fresh water to the citizens. This is also the site of the final scene in the graphic novel 'Death - the high cost of living' by Neil Gaiman.

    [Bethesda Fountain, Central Park]

  • In the air

    [Reine at Radio City Music Hall, 6th Avenue]

  • Point of entry

    This island located in New York Harbor was once the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States. Over 20 million immigrants have passed through these gates, probably even my own relatives.

    [Ellis Island]

  • Escape from New York

    [Mandus in the tunnels below Grand Central Terminal]

  • No flat tires

    The oddly shaped Flatiron building lies at the intersection of 5th avenue and Broadway, two of the most well-known streets in the world. Next to it lies Madison Square Park, believed to be the birthplace of baseball.

    [Flatiron building, viewed from Empire State Building]

  • Fire and ice

    The plaza below Paul Manship's Prometheus statue is used as an ice-skating rink during winter.

    [Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center]

  • No soup for you

    I suppose the authorities does have humor after all.

    [34th Street]

  • Never forgotten

    The open wound of Manhattan, what was once the Twin Towers.

    [Ground Zero]

  • The guardian

    The Lady Liberty is keeping an eye on the New York harbor.

    [View from a helicopter south of Manhattan]

  • City defender

    The squirrels of New York are just as tough as the human residents.

    [Anonymous squirrel in Central Park]

  • Construction time again

    One year after 9/11, it's still a big hole in the ground.

    [Ground Zero]

  • Running man

    The early runners of NY Marathon is entering the finish line at the south end of Central Park.

    [NY Marathon finish line]

  • Under a blood red sky

    This is the city that never sleeps. Or so they say, but the financial blocks on the southern tip straight ahead transforms into a ghost town after dark.

    [Lower Manhattan with the Brooklyn Bridge]

  • Electric tower

    This 71-floor building towers above the tumbling ice skaters. This is the headquarter of NBC and Saturday Night Live.

    [General Electric building at Rockefeller Plaza]

  • Fingers of God

    Sunrays are caressing the skyscrapers of lower Manhattan, with the Statue of Liberty seen at the horizon.

    [View from Empire State Building]

  • None shall pass

    The 42nd Street entrance to Grand Central Terminal is being guarded by statues of mythological characters created in 1914 by French sculptor Jules-Alexis Coutan.

    [Chrysler building and Grand Central Terminal, along 42nd Street]

Reine

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Reine is a web developer who enjoys caffeine-fueled urban traveling. More...

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