Mink Machine

The creative revolution

I love this “creative revolution” that has been taking place these last ten years. People are writing blogs, uploading film clips on YouTube, sharing music on SoundCloud and connecting on various social media. And all of this is made on a global scale!

Sure, most of the blog writers are certainly not Shakespeare, nor are the moviemakers Spielberg, but at least they are doing creative stuff. It’s hard to believe that 99% of these things were simply not there at all only ten years ago.

The web is a unique and revolutionary platform for sharing and communication, bringing together all the earlier elements of radio, television and telephone.

20 years ago I got my first cellphone. It was large as a brick and could only be used as a telephone (doh). Today most people run around with a device in their pocket equipped with more processing power than the computers which placed Armstrong on the moon.

That same device is also a portable music player (which was amazing ten years ago), digital camera, video recorder, web browser, communication device, game station, compass, map, GPS and much more. Some decades ago such a device was considered science fiction.

It’s no wonder that Encyclopedia Britannia recently announced that they will stop doing their printed edition. A publication that has been on the shelves since 1768, the oldest encyclopedia in the English-speaking world.

The iPad slightly shifted user focus from creator to consumer, due to lack of a mouse, precision marking, good keyboard and so on. But I don’t think it will make a difference in the long run. The creative process is here to stay. Al Gore recently spoke at SXSW in Austin about the enormous possibilities of internet and I think its importance just cannot be stated enough.

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