Mink Machine

The web of tomorrow

It’s quite fascinating, really. The last ten years has seen the web transform from a geek amusement to vital channel for public service. At that time almost no one knew what a web page was, let alone had one. I remember searching for Jean Michel Jarre links for my humble personal site about eleven years ago. The search result was about ten, containing sparse discography information in plain text format.

The web is arguably fastest growing invention of all time, connecting people in a way unfathomable mere decades ago. Where will the web be in 30 years? Will there still be hyperlinks? Will the browsers of today be replaced and refined by touchpads, intellivision and voice recognition? Will it collapse under it’s own weight? Under adverts, spam, foul postings and ever-growing blogosphere? Only one thing is certain: The web, in one form or another, is here to stay.

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